About your Search

20130218
20130218
STATION
WHUT (Howard University Television) 3
CSPAN 2
CSPAN2 2
KQED (PBS) 2
WETA 2
CNBC 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
WMPT (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
a change relative to the u.s.? >> there are going to be some challenges -- channels of communications. i do not expect best friends between america and united states but i expect the town to get better. it is in a terrible state. they have the highest inflation in latin america. they have food court -- of food shortages all over the place. that is why hugo chavez has come back to calm things down. they are in for a rough time. >> any guess on who the successor might be? >> his current vice-president is in the best position. hugo chavez designated him in december. he does not have his charisma, but he is in the strongest position right now. >> in other news, a former u.s. prosecutor house called for the international court to investigate war crimes in syria. he is working on an inquiry into the syrian conflict, reporting on human-rights violations of both sides. including the use of mass executions and the imprisonment of children. evidence has gathered more than 500 syrian refugees. people have been reported to be wounded in a clash at mines in south africa. it's they were wounded by rubber
street or for the u.s. a main street brand. but they have this great digital fashion thing going on. it's a gimmicky partnership with google. you see these reports about google getting the lines between fashion and retail and tech are all blurring. >> they are, indeed. so on today's show, there's a -- here is another taster. in china, it's the first trading day market in the new year of the snake. so will it be new year old problems? up next from hong kong, we'll have the latest analysis. >> did you just slither? also, the final week of campaigning in italy ahead of the general elections. we will be live in milan throughout the morning for a roundup of the candidates policies and pit falls. julia will join us for that. >>> and hear state from the finance ministers. we have a roundup of the g-20 meeting in moscow. >> and london fashion week is under way and international expansion seems to be the latest trend. we'll hear from top designers who are putting their foot forward on the global runway. >>> first, standard & poors says it wants more time to gauge shinzo abe's rating policies. s&
the fire on the carnival cruise ship triumph. yesterday, the u.s. coast guard said the fire started in front of a generator in the main engine crime. that fire left the cruise liner without power for five days with 4200 people on board. investigators say it could take up to a year to determine what exactly caused the fire. despite that initial report from the coast guard, congress says it still wants answers into the cruise ship disaster. hours after the triumph was towed to alabama, senator jay rockefeller september a letter to the -- sent a letter to the coast guard, demanding a review of the incident and similar incidents in the last six years. the senator says there might be a larger safety issue that needs to be reviewed involving large passenger vehicles. >>> and when congress returns next week, they will only have four days for the sequester. coming up, the automatic budget cuts here for california. >>> why facebook's tax bill is zero. in fact, the social media giant will get a huge refund. >>> and what russian scientists are finding after friday's meteor explosion and the ne
of millions of dollars of support from u.s. taxpayers. it's been called a game-changer that might relieve military pressure on israel and make it easier to achieve peace in the middle east, and that was something we decided we had to see for ourselves. ( siren blaring ) ( people screaming ) over the past 11 years, more than 15,000 rockets and mortars have been fired at israel by hezbollah in lebanon, and by hamas in the gaza strip. until recently, the only thing israeli civilians could do was run for cover. but in the latest round of fighting between israel and hamas late last year, some people stopped running and tried to get some good pictures, because this time, when hamas fired rockets from gaza at israeli cities, iron dome fired missiles to intercept them in the sky before they could do any damage on the ground. you're looking at an iron dome missile on its way. you can't see the hamas rocket it's going after, but watch how the missile will adjust its course to get close to the hamas rocket and blow it up. at night, the images of iron dome are even more spectacular. this video was ta
the world, to cheap cigars -- which the u.s. military tried to get away with giving him -- to arguments from his generals and to diet warnings and suggestions from his wife. these were largely ignored, especially the one that involved his eating only tomatoes. as i dug into all these materials, it became clear to me that for someone with churchill's great conversational skill and his ability to create a congenial setting, meals had an advantage over most kinds of meetings. they could be as long as he liked, and in the case of dinners, they could run into the wee hours when churchill gathered strength and others tired. his daughter, mary, reports that luncheon and dinner conversations often became so extended that meal times tended to prolong themselves far into the afternoon or evening with luncheons lasting sometimes until half past three. a typical evening, let's say, at checkers which is the prime minister's country house would begin at 8:30 with champagne in the drawing room. dinner would last from 9 to 10, 10:30, then cigars after the ladies were excused. when the men had rejoined the l
the threat posed by guerrillas. the fact that the u.s. army and marine corps and other modern militaries including the french have to deal with the threat today is absolutely unsurprising. but i don't mean to suggest that absolutely nothing has changed over the course of the last 5,000 years. there have, in fact, been some significant changes. the biggest one has to do with the power of public opinion and propaganda. and this was something that was demonstrated in our very own war of independence. now, when we think of the american war of independence, we tend of think of battles like lexington and concord where the yankees slithered on their bellies and shot at the redcoats from behind trees and rocks in ways that the redcoats assumed to be ungentlemanly. now, these were, no doubt, effective tactics. but in the end what's striking to me about studying the american revolution is the extent to which it was decided not so much by what happened on the battlefield, but what actually happened in the house of parliament, in the commons in england. now, when you read conventional accounts, if i
reportedly accused the u.s. state department of being an adjunct of the israeli foreign ministry. the speech was not recorded, but fox news has spoken to the former new jersey congressional candidate who last week tipped off lawmakers to those comments and he is standing by his climbs that that's exactly what chuck hagel said and that's not the first controversial comment the man who would like to run our defense department has made about our close ally israel. however, he's denying he said it. none the less, in the wake of the controversy, now it appears that some democrats, the president's pick, some democrats may be second guessing president obama's pick for secretary of defense. take a listen how journalist bob woodward put it on fox news sunday. >> i understand some of them eventually called the white house and said, is hagel going to withdraw, would he consider withdrawing. the answer is an emphatic no. i wonder if the democrats are kind of ever looking and asking what really is the fundamental question here, is he the best person to be secretary of defense. >> megyn: chris stirewalt h
. >> the japanese yen has continued its slide against the u.s. dollar today. they were not following a lack of restraint against the japanese authorities. it was thought the central bankers meeting over the weekend were calling for governments to stop taking action to weaken their currencies, but the final communique out of japan is criticism over the recent weakness. let's have a quick look to see how european markets are fairing. as we can see, a mixture across the board. being led lower by weaker mining stocks, all of it being affected by the equities there being closed for presidents day. that is all for me. i will be back with a bit more. >> thank you very much. the latest headlines from bbc news, david cameron promises to make it easier for indian students to trade and study in the uk as he kicks off his tour of mumbai. hugo chavez from -- announcing his return to the country after cancer surgery. the bbc has apologized for any disruption that has been caused to the broadcast today as some members of the national union of journalists have walked out in protest against compulsory redun
or relink wrbd the reigns then had quite a long struggle. i think part of the whole reason that the u.s., i'm sort of an amateur student of the u.s. automobile industry. i think part of the reason that it ran into trouble was way before the 1970s. it was because the founders of those companies had relinquished the reign reins to businesspeople, not product people. >> rose: buzz as soon as you say that, i would make this observation. look what happened to ford. >> yes. >> rose: c.e.o. of ford. >> yes, yeah. >> rose: -- grew newspaper the car business, was not an engineer but was a superb manager. and great sensibility for product. and i think-- . >> rose: yeah. >> and i think that's the element that gets missed a lot of the time. in these management turnovers. and particularly for technology company. you absolutely have to have as the guiding force of an abiding enduring technology company, a person or people at the helm who have products in their dna. >> rose: yeah. >> who love, who are crazed by the idea of making that thing better. >> better. >> the best. or making it better or the best o
of america put out a piece, talking about the u.s. celebrating president's day. it first became a federal holiday in 1879 to celebrate the february 22nd birthday of george washington, the first u.s. president. joe in maryland, democrat, hi. caller: my favorit would have to have been bill clinton. there are so many to choose from. i was very young. it was in high school at the time. he put into place a lot of laws that allow for people like me to go to college. beyond that, he was just incredibly involved in science necessarily see a lot of a a lot of presidents do now. host: from oklahoma, an independent caller. caller: my favorite president has to be lyndon johnson. look what he did for civil rights not only for americans but for everybody in this country. he fought through the garage of our southern states, and he got it through. -- fought through the brage of our southern states. lyndon johnson said, "when i sign these proclamations, i am turning the south over to the republican party." the city just agreed with the emancipation proclamation. this is in 2013. lyndon johnson fought for
as well. neil, the reason? people are saying because refine riz are down. the u.s. says our oil reserves are up. the fact is they're saying there's more necessity for gas around the globe, and that causes prices to spike, and here in california, as you hear a bus backing up to my right, people are not too happy whatsoever at all. they drive in and out of the station we're at. 4.99. you can drive around southern california in the car culture and fine a number of stations already above $5 a gallon. and again, we're in the middle of winter. wait until april comes around and the summer driving season starts and the prices spike then. people are worried we might see $6 a gallon here in california. i. >> neil: adam, thank you very much. even before the cold, it would cost you more to fill your car. wait until you see how much more it could be costing you just to heat your home. phil is on the -- with the latest on the chill pill. reporter: in the northeast if you're heating with heating oil, prices are 91-cents a gallon more than a year ago, this is mainly because of the aftermath of hurrican
tomorrow, a look at the role of the business community in higher education. that is from the u.s. chamber of commerce in washington. among the speakers, the educational secretary in george w. bush's second term. > host: we take a look at how your taxpayer dollars are being spent. on this presidents day, we will focus on presidents and what sort of benefits they get after they leave office. let's begin with a history. when did taxpayers start paying for these benefits for presidents after they leave office? guest: the act was enacted in 1958. the idea occurred around 1912. andrew carnegie decided he wanted to use his foundation to pay about $25,000 a year in pensions to former presidents. the first former president that would have been able to use that $25,000 happened to be his friend taft. taft did not need the money. he was a professor at yale. he became the supreme court justice. he had to walk a delicate balance of telling his friend thanks but no thanks and decided not to accept it. andrew carnegie and never articulated why he wanted to pay the pension. members of congress thought it
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)